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Inuit Broadcasting Corporation

22:01
Uakallanga - Qilauti (Drum)

The traditional drum was made of drift wood that a man would often find in the water while sailing his qajaq. The skin was made of a thin rawhide from a caribou stomach. The skin was wrapped with ivalu which is the sinew of a caribou back. The katuk (stick) was made from left over wood or antler and the thickest leather you could find either aiviq (walrus) or ujjuk (bearded seal) wrapped around. A modern drum is made of lumber, wax thread, nails, leather and glue. We invite David Serkoak, a long time drum dancer and drum maker to explain the process of making both a traditional and modern drum as well as teaching us the maintenance involved. He also shares the history of the qilauti (drum), the dance moves and the rituals surrounding the songs and performance.

Duration: 22:01

22:01
Uakallanga - Unaaq (Harpoon)

The Unaaq (Harpoon) has many uses for the Inuit, two main uses are for harpooning a catch such as seals at their breathing holes, walruses, whales and other sea and land animals such as caribou. This ancient weapon was also used to make sure the ice is safe, by harpooning the ice you will step on. For many years Inuit made this tool from animal bones and used dried walrus intestines cut up to make rope. Today, Inuit make their harpoons from what is readily available in modern technology such as steep rods for the fore shaft and their heads, the arrow from brass, steel or aluminum. A hunter from Iqaluit, Jerry Ell will take us through the many steps to make a modern harpoon and he will also show us the way he makes an arrow.

Duration: 22:01

22:01
Uakallanga - Arts & Crafts

The north is filled with talented artists, some artists are known worldwide. In this episode we will see a variety of art. Johnny Qamaniq will show us how he makes jewellery earrings. Theresa Ukkalianuk will show how she makes a beaded necklace, and then Barbara Akoak will show how she makes earrings out of tulugak (Raven) feet.

Duration: 22:01

22:01
Uakallanga - Kakkivak (spear)

For centuries the fish spear known to Inuit as the Kakivak has been in existence. It has assisted Inuit in spearing fish from rivers. This spear would have been made mostly from bone and occasionally driftwood for the long shaft; the point would have been sharper, at times made of rock, but mostly bone. These days there is plenty of wood around, and the point could be made from steel, brass or other hard elements. In this episode we will watch Solomon Awa, a hunter from Iqaluit, originally from Pond Inlet demonstrate the making of a modern Kakivak.

Duration: 22:01

22:01
Uakallanga - Tunniit (Traditional Tattoo)

Many Inuit mostly women are taking part in a revival of traditional Inuit tattoos. Traditionally, Inuit women, mostly in their teenage years received symbolic designs on their face and arms and sometimes on their legs as an expression of beauty. The tools used were made of caribou bone for stitching and poking. Stitching would be done with a bone needle and the thread made of sinew from the back of a caribou muscle soaked in natural ink such as soot of a burning traditional seal oil lamp. The needle would be used again when the tattoo was finished the needle would be stored in a seal skin cover with seal fat to protect it from getting dirty.

Duration: 22:01